S. Parker Gilbert (1st of 3)

One of a group of businessmen and bankers who influenced, maybe even dominated, American policy in the 1920s, S. (for Seymour) Parker Gilbert left his mark on cornerstone tax policy as well as on foreign policy. I’ll devote a set of 3 posts to this little-known man who crammed a lot of service into his short life.

Part 1: Mastermind of tax reform

Born in New Jersey in 1892, Gilbert studied at Rutgers before graduating from Harvard Law School in 1915. He then joined the prestigious New York City law firm of Cravath and Henderson. With the entry of the U.S. into World War I, Gilbert joined the war loan staff at the Department of Treasury, then led by William G. McAdoo, where he served until appointed assistant secretary of the Treasury for fiscal affairs at the age of 27. A Republican, he was a close friend and associate of Russell C. Leffingwell who preceded him in the fiscal affairs position.

Library of Congress Call No.:LC-F81- 38908

Mellon and Gilbert in January 1926

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