Weakest front-runner ever?

Newt Gingrich opined recently that Mitt Romney was about the weakest front-runner since Leonard Wood. Leaving aside the question of what that, if true, says about Newt’s campaign, it piqued my interest – just who was Leonard Wood? Continue reading

Smoke-filled room or insurrection? The 1920 GOP vice-presidential nomination

Irvine L. Lenroot, 1869 - 1949

Sometimes, reading a patent falsehood on the web or elsewhere will prompt the wish to set things straight with a blog post of one’s own. The other day I read somewhere that Calvin Coolidge was named the 1920 GOP vice-presidential nominee as the result of a cabal in a smoke-filled room. As we Coolidge fans and followers know, that is the opposite of what happened.

The 1920 Republican national convention began June 8, 1920, at the Chicago Coliseum. Balloting for the nomination of the presidential candidate began Friday, June 11. Going in, the leading candidates were Frank O. Lowden, the well-regarded, moderate, and wealthy governor of Illinois, and General Leonard Wood, a long-time friend and associate of the late Theodore Roosevelt – these two were deadlocked. The other leading contenders were the fiery progressive Senator Hiram Johnson of California, and the amiable and undistingished, yet eminently presidential-looking Senator Warren G. Harding of Ohio.

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Eisenhower, Coolidge, Daniels – beloved reluctant candidates?

In what has been called “Broder’s Law,” the late David Broder stated that anyone who is prepared to do what you have to do to become president shouldn’t be allowed to be president. And truly, in an ideal world, ability, not ambition, should be the decisive factor in determining who should govern.

These days more so than in the past, however, it seems that politicians have to engage in near-constant campaigning to attain and then keep public office. And while we the voters realize and have come to expect this, we also regret and despise it; we yearn for the candidate who is reluctant, ideally someone who already has made their mark in a non-political field, has accomplished something and could enjoy the fruits of his or her success, and only through the great clamor of the man in the street is talked into running for office.

Yes, we like to see some reluctance on the part of politicians, as described well by Irving Berlin in the song “They Like Ike” from the musical “Call Me Madam”, the song that became something of a campaign song for Dwight D. Eisenhower.

“They like Ike, and Ike is good on a mike;

they like Ike, but Ike says he don’t wanna.”

“That makes Ike they kind of fella they like,

and what’s more, they seem to think he’s gonna.”

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